Is Persecution Just a Myth?


Christian persecution Mosul IraqI must apologize to my readers for not having written a review of The Myth of Persecution by Candida Moss of the University of Notre Dame. I have to admit that I put her book (whether fairly or unfairly) in the category of “negative attention seeker.” What I mean by that phrase is that some people seem to gain attention by shock value and negative response. (Think Ann Coulter, Al Franken, and Michael Moore).  In these instances, I find it better not to respond. There is no sense feeding the monster.

Fortunately, I do not have to respond to Moss’s book because two very capable scholars have done this work for us. Michael Haykin of Southern Seminary has this to say,

Moss has the scholarly credentials and knowledge to make her case sound convincing, though, in the final analysis, her thesis is far from compelling.

And N. Clayton Croy from Trinity Lutheran Seminary sums up Moss’s work this way:

Despite the author’s considerable erudition, this is a deeply flawed book, a work of revisionist history.

Both of the reviews are fair and helpful and remind us that persecution is very real. Of course, Iraq, Syria, Egypt, Nigeria, Pakistan, and a host of other countries remind us of this fact as well.